Sol C. Johnson

It might be easier to say what Sol C. Johnson (1867-1954) didn’t do than what he did, as his accomplishments and contributions were so vast.

He helped found the Carnegie Library on Henry Street, which according to Connect Savannah:

HERE’S A FACTOID that might surprise even the most studious Savannah bookworm: When the Carnegie Library opened its thick double doors in August 1914, it didn’t just have the distinction of being the city’s first library to serve black citizens—it was Savannah’s first freestanding public library, period.

Sol C Johnson is in the back row, third from the left

And according to the website for Sol C Johnson High School:

Sol Charles Johnson was the editor and publisher of the Savannah Tribune from 1889 to 1954.

Johnson achieved the rank of Adjutant in the State Militia. He served until the African American Militia was disbanded.

Johnson was a leader in many community affairs such as:

  • Secretary of Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Masons – 54 years
  • Clerk of his church – 45 years
  • Chairman of Board of Trustees – approx. 30 years
  • Vice-Moderator of National Council Congregational Churches
  • Member of the first Inter-racial Committee
  • An organizer and director of Citizens Committee for African American Social Work
  • Director of the USO-YMCA – West Broad Street
  • Member of coordinating committee for the erection of Cuyler Street School

He was a leader in most movements for the civic welfare of Negro citizens in this community, whose opinion was respected by prominent community leaders. His impact on African American life was felt up to the time of his death.

The period of his activities covered 66 years.

Sol C. Johnson’s voter registration at age 34, 10th row down.
Burial plot card for Laurel Grove South

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